Pulse Surveys: A Guide for HR Managers and Decision-Makers

Culture
January 23, 2023
Pulse Surveys: A Guide for HR Managers and Decision-Makers

Pulse surveys are a fantastic tool that companies can use to measure employee engagement, satisfaction, and identify areas for improvement. They are designed to provide real-time insights and allow companies to stay ahead of potential issues and make changes before they become problems.

his guide is designed to provide a resource for HR managers and decision-makers on how to create pulse surveys for their own teams.

Why companies use pulse surveys

Companies use pulse surveys for a variety of reasons. The most common include measuring employee engagement and satisfaction, identifying areas for improvement, tracking progress over time, and improving communication and collaboration.

Pulse surveys are also preferred over traditional annual or semi-annual surveys as they provide real-time insights and allow for more timely and relevant feedback. They also give employees a voice and allow their opinions to be heard within larger decision-making processes.

Pulse surveys are a valuable tool for any company and, if used correctly, can lead to a more positive and productive workplace culture in the long run.

How to create a pulse survey

Creating a pulse survey is a relatively simple process. The first step is to define the goals and objectives of the survey. Next, determine the frequency of the survey. This can be weekly, monthly, or even quarterly. Identify the target audience, select and create the questions, and test the survey before deployment.

Tips and best practices for creating an effective pulse survey include keeping the survey short, using clear and concise questions, and providing anonymity for employee responses.

Examples of pulse survey questions

Pulse surveys can include a variety of question types, including multiple choice, open-ended, and rating scale questions. Here are some examples you can use.

Employee engagement

  • On a scale of 1-5, how engaged do you feel in your work?
  • In the past week, how often did you feel motivated to complete your work?
  • How likely are you to recommend our company as a great place to work?

Communication and collaboration

  • In the past week, how often did you feel like your ideas were heard and considered by your team?
  • How well do you feel your team communicates and collaborates with each other?
  • On a scale of 1-5, how well do you feel your team works together to achieve common goals?

Workplace culture

  • How satisfied are you with the company's commitment to creating a positive and inclusive work environment?
  • On a scale of 1-5, how well do you feel the company supports work-life balance?
  • How satisfied are you with the company's policies and procedures for addressing workplace concerns and conflicts?

Manager-employee relationships

  • In the past week, how often did you feel your manager provided clear and timely feedback on your performance?
  • How well do you feel your manager supports your professional development?
  • On a scale of 1-5, how comfortable do you feel giving your manager honest feedback?

NPS (eNPS) Used for Measuring Culture

Another valuable type of pulse survey question is the eNPS. eNPS stands for "employee net promoter score." It is a measure of employee satisfaction and engagement, and it is based on the idea that employees who are highly satisfied and engaged are more likely to recommend their employer to others.

eNPS is typically used as a benchmark for measuring and improving employee engagement and satisfaction over time. An example of an eNPS question might be:

"On a scale of 0-10, how likely are you to recommend working at our company to a friend or colleague?"

The eNPS formula is quite simple. It is calculated by subtracting the percentage of employees who are "detractors" (people who answer the question with a score of 0-6) from the percentage of employees who are "promoters" (people who answer the question with a score of 9-10). The result is the eNPS score, which can range from -100 to 100.

Promoters are employees who are highly satisfied and engaged, and are likely to recommend the company to others. Detractors are employees who are not satisfied and engaged, and are likely to discourage others from working for the company. Passives are employees who fall in between and are not particularly positive or negative about the company.

eNPS can be used as a benchmark by comparing the eNPS scores of different companies or organizations. A higher eNPS score generally indicates higher levels of employee satisfaction and engagement, while a lower eNPS score indicates lower levels of satisfaction and engagement. However, it's important to keep in mind that eNPS scores should be compared within the same industry or job area to be relevant.

Measure What Matters With Pulse Survey Questions

Pulse surveys are a valuable tool for any company looking to measure and improve employee engagement, satisfaction, and identify areas for improvement. By following the steps outlined in this guide and using the provided examples of pulse survey questions, organization leaders can create effective pulse surveys for their own teams.

WorkStory to facilitates the easiest method for collecting pulse survey responses by integrating with the tools your team already uses like Slack, Microsoft Teams, Webex, or email. This allows HR managers and executives to collect more information about the company more frequently, without getting in the way of the team's work.

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